Understand

Isfahan is a city in central Iran, south of Tehran and is the capital of Esfahan Province. The Persians call it “Nesf-e-Jahan”, meaning “Half The World”. Due to its beautiful hand-painted tiling and magnificent public square, it is considered to be one of the most beautiful cities in the world. An ancient town and capital of Persia from 1598 to 1722, it was long noted for its fine carpets and silver filigree. Today, textile and steel mills take their place. Its architecture, tree-lined boulevards and relaxed pace make it one of the highlights of Iran. The city is 430km south of Tehran at the foothills of the Zagros mountain range. The city enjoys a temperate climate and regular seasons. Isfahan is located on the main north-south and east-west routes crossing Iran. It is similar to Denver in the United States in terms of altitude and precipitation. It is the twin city of Freiburg and Freiburg street in Isfahan is famous.

Get around

It is easy to get around Isfahan by bus. A single journey costs IRR5000; you can pay the driver directly, or buy multi-journey contactless cards at certain bus stop booths. Note that there are separate men (front) and women (rear) sections on each bus.
From Kaveh Bus Terminal, take Bus 91 which runs down Chahar Bagh-e Pa'in St towards the city centre, past Takhti Junction and Imam Hossein Sq.

See

Naqsh-e Jahan Square also known as shah square or imam square-1602. The square contains two mosques, a palace, and the bazaar. The square is the largest historical public square in the world after Tiananmen Square in Beijing and it is one of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. The square is surrounded by buildings from the Safavid era. This a very popular place for locals to picnic on Friday and holiday evenings.

Meydan Kohne (Kohne Square)

Shahshahan Square

Chaharbagh Boulevard – 1596, dating from the Saffavid era, the avenue is the most historically famous in all of Persia.
Chaharbagh-e-khajou Boulevard.

Imam Mosque (fka Shah Mosque before Iran's Revolution), In Naghsh-i Jahan Square. Built during the Safavid period, it is an excellent example of Islamic architecture of Iran, and regarded as one of the masterpieces of Persian Architecture. It is registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Its splendor is mainly due to the beauty of its seven-colour mosaic tiles and calligraphic inscriptions. edit

Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque- one of the architectural masterpieces of Safavid Iranian architecture, this mosque is considered to be the most beautiful in Iran. Built in 1602 by Shah Abbas I.= and designed by his chief architect, Sheikh Bahai. The mosque was designed to be a private mosque for the royal family and therefore it does not have any minarets. There is a tunnel from the mosque to the Royal Palace, across the square.
Hakim Mosque – one of the oldest mosques in Isfahan. Built by Shah Abbas II between 1656 and 1662. Located on the site of a 10th century mosque. The portal was covered in mud until it was discovered in 1956.

Ālī Qāpū(The Royal Palace) – Early 17th Century. It is forty-eight metres high and there are seven floors, each accessible by a difficult spiral staircase. In the sixth floor music room, deep circular niches are found in the walls, having not only aesthetic value, but also acoustic. It is rich in naturalistic wall paintings by Reza Abbassi, the court painter of Shah Abbas I, and his pupils. There are floral, animal and bird motifs.
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Do

  • Take a taxi to the south of the city to Soffeh Mountain and catch a telecabin up for IRR60,000 or go bowling at the only bowling alley in the city underneath the telecabin station.
  • Walk along beautiful Zayanderood river and enjoy well maintained parks and historic bridges on the ways.
  • Enjoy a horse-drawn carriage ride in the historic Naqshe-Jahan square.
  • Have a picnic in Nazhvan garden and enjoy the scenery
  • Take a walk in Chahar-Bagh street while enjoying Persian saffron ice-cream
  • Take a day trip to Kashan and Qamsar, especially during the months that local Rosewater production is underway in Qamsar.

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